GLOSSARY

DAISHO: The dual swords a samurai uses, katana and wakizashi.  The katana the longer blade was mainly used for slicing as it could pierce armor while the shorter blade was used for close combat, stabbing, blocking,  and seppuku.  Both blades together tell of social status and personal honor.

BUSHIDO: Meaning, Way of the Warrior. Is a Japanese code of conduct samurai warrior were meant to follow those include: Gi-Rectitude, Yu-Courage, Jin-Benevolence, Rei-Respect, Makoto-Honesty, Meiyo-Honor, and Chungi- Loyalty.

KISSAKITip of sword

MENPOMetal mask cover all or part of the face

HANAMACHIA community formed by successful Ochaya and is generally made up of retired Geisha and their families, where they hoped for female children to carry on the lineage of Geisha. 

BOKKEN: A bokken is a wooden Japanese sword used for training, usually the size and shape of a normal katana.  Bokken are lethal weapons in themselves and Miyamoto Musashi was infamous for fighting fully armed foes with only one or two bokken.  – Young Samurai

KENJUTSUThe Art of the Sword

TAIJUTSU The Art of the Body

KYUJUTSU The Art of the Bow

DIM MAKDeath Touch

KAINinja hand sign for sensing danger

NINJATONinja sword

TANTOKnife

DOKUJUTSUArt of Poison

GOTONPOArt of Concealment

SHINOBI SHOZOKU Clothing of a ninja (Shinobi – stealer in)

GAIJINDerogatory term for outsider or foreigner

HAKAMATraditional Japanese trousers

HASHIChopsticks

INROSmall carrying case for small objects usually attached to the obi

KAMISpirits within objects of the Shinto faith

SENCHAGreen Tea

NAMING EXTENSIONS

sanused informally such as someone we know more personally and formally such as Mr. or Mrs like you would adress a teacher.
samais used for someone of higher status
kun and chanare normally used at the end of children’s names sometimes a boss would use it addressing an employee. 
Dono and tono roughly mean “lord” or “master”. This title is no longer used in daily conversation, though it is still used in some types of written business correspondence.

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